Finding a Job Sucks: A Dislocated Tech Company

I think this entry will be the last of this variety for a while. Mostly because I haven’t had any interviews in a while that are worth writing about.

In August or September, I interviewed for this company called Sanmita. 

The founder and CEO was looking for a web content editor or a digital content creator. Something like that. I found the job on Indeed. One thing that irritated me about the application process was that I needed to complete an automated phone interview. It was weird talking to someone who was not actually on the other line.

I remember receiving a response to my application fairly quickly. In fact, I scheduled an interview before I did the stupid phone interview. Not sure how I got to schedule an interview before the phone questionnaire, but whatever. 

During that time I had also applied to Wake Tech Community College to teach Adobe InDesign. I was surprised to hear from them, because I had initially submitted my application way back in June. 

So I had that on my plate as well as a potential design client and I asked the founder to reschedule my interview. 

Quite honestly, I was not that interested in the position because it was in Cary, and I didn’t feel like hitting the beltline every day. But it sounded like something I could grow with. 

The Interview

Sanmita was in a small single-story brick office building. The CEO apparently shared the office suite with other small business owners and entreprenuers.

I was not enthusiastic about the interview and was a few minutes late. 

When I entered the office building, it was super quiet and looked empty. There was a front waiting area and closed doors. I stood around for a  minute or two contemplating whether or not to leave.  But hoping against hope, I tried the door to my immediate left and surprised the occupant.

I asked him if he could tell me where Sanmita was, and he guided me to the right door. I entered the door on my far right and there sat a middle-aged Indian man. He was the CEO of Sanmita. I’ll call him Sanjeev.

Hoop Jumping

Sanjeev didn’t want to hire me right away.

No. Instead, he wanted me to work on a sample project before he moved forward with hiring me. In other words, he wanted to me to do free work before he would take me on as a contract to permanent hire. 

Sigh.

He wanted me to treat him like I would one of my design clients. The only problem is that I’ve never done content editing before. 

So did a bunch of Google searching on the subject and how I would go about tackling this concept. 

Since the first thing I ask my clients to do is fill out a questionnaire, I cobbled together a questionnaire for Sanjeev based on my limited understanding of content editing. 

I uploaded it to Google Forms and sent him the link. After he completed the form and sent it back to me, I was unsure of what to do next. And actually, I had interviewed for another nonprofit job and was hoping for a second interview. So honestly, I was not invested in this “opportunity.”

And I had to admit to myself that I was doing work for free in hopes Sanjeev would hire me on as a contractor, and then as a permanent employee.

Where is Everybody?