Finding a Job Sucks: Is an Aspiring Freelancer Fit for Office Life?

My answer to this question is: no. 

There’s a reason you fled office life and cubicle hell.

There’s a reason you eschew office politics, group think, and fake camaraderie.

You have a different vision for your life. One that includes creativity, freedom of thought, meaningful interpersonal interactions, and quality work that fulfills your soul.

You despise meaningless, repetitive, administrative tasks. 

You hate time-wasting activities and pointless meetings concocted by your supervisors to give the false impression of productivity.

You hate the middle/high school mentality displayed by people who are old enough to know better.

You know your time, your life could be better spent working on your own dreams and aspirations instead of using your time and energy to build the dreams of some company or organization who couldn’t give a damn about you.

You relish the idea of crafting your own life, setting your own rules, and fulfilling your destiny.

Yes, your destiny is actually important to you. You take it seriously, because you realize you only have one life and live, and the years are ticking by…

As a freelancer, you value freedom, obviously. You want to come and go as you please. You don’t feel the need to get someone’s permission to take time off to enjoy your own life.

 You enjoy creating things, products, and services that are actually meaningful and have a positive impact on the people you wish to serve. 

You’re happy to escape the bureaucracy and nonsensical bottlenecks that impede the flow of your work and make it nearly impossible to accomplish anything meaningful.

Even still, you are tired of compulsory performance reviews that feel more like being called into the principal’s office than an actual discussion of your goals and accomplishments. As a freelancer, your clients’ testimonies are your performance reviews, and they’re 10 times more pleasant than any standardized, institutional form and checklist will ever be.

If you are a freelancer, you value autonomy and meaningful collaborations. You love working with people who fire you up and inspire you.

You understand the value of divine connections and the synergistic effects of like-minded people who are focused on the same goals, unlike the “professionals” you were forced to work with during your time in office purgatory.

And that’s what it feels like, doesn’t it? A little slice of hell you get to taste every day that eventually erodes your health, your sanity, and eventually depletes your very soul.

Office life is hell, and it’s meant for people who have no dreams of their own. It’s meant for people who have no real skill, talent, or vision for their lives. Or it’s for the people who are too afraid to live their dreams and take a chance on themselves. For those who value “comfort” and “safety” at the expense of their creative freedom. For those that thrive off of other people’s shallow approval.

I worked in an office for ten years, and it was a hell that consumed me until I finally broke free. By the end of my office purgatory, I had gained weight, I had digestive problems, and I was mentally and emotionally in tatters. I suffered deep wounding from years of mental and verbal abuse from a previous supervisor. I suffered ostracism, racism, and a constant diminishing of my skills and talents from envious and competitive coworkers.

Leaving that job (not career, don’t get it twisted) two years ago was an act of desperation. 

And I would do it again. 

Freelancing is not easy in the slightest. It’s really difficult, and I haven’t been totally successful at it. 

But the taste of freedom it has afforded me is worth the hardships and difficulties I’ve encountered, because now I am counting on myself to create the kind of meaningful life and work that eluded me when I was an office slave.

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